High Holy Days

Please see the Facebook page for specific times and more information!

Shabbat– Friday at sundown to an hour after sunset Saturday. This is the first holy day given in Lev. 23. No work permitted according to Torah.

Rosh Chodesh– Each new month/moon on the Hebrew calendar. Shofar is blown and special prayers are recited.

Pesach [Passover]- Passover or Pesach is a major Jewish holiday and one of the most widely celebrated. Together with Shavuot and Sukkot, Passover was one of the Three Pilgrimage Festivals during which the entire male population of the Israel were required to made pilgrimage to the Temple in Jerusalem.  It is also a celebration of Adonia’s deliverance from Egyptian bondage for His Chosen People.

Passover 2021 will begin in the evening of March 27 and ends April 4. See our facebook page for updates on Congregational celebration times and dates.

The Feast of Unleavened Bread– As part of Passover or Pesach, this feast is celebrated by refraining from any foods containing leven throughout the seven days of Passover. This includes yeast & baking soda/powder, though eggs are ok. No work permitted on the first and last day.

Shavuot [Pentecost]- is celebrated for two days outside the land of Israel. Shavuot (Feast of Weeks) commemorates the revelation of the Torah on Mt. Sinai to the Jewish people, and occurs on the 50th day after the 49 days of counting the Omer.  No work permitted according to Torah on this day.

Shavuot 2021 will begin May 16 and ends May 18. See our facebook page for updates on Congregational celebration times and dates.

Yom Teruah [Rosh HaShanah] Rosh Hashanah, literally meaning “head [of] the year”, is the Jewish New Year. The biblical name for this holiday is Yom Teruah, literally “day of shouting or blasting”. It is part of the Jewish High Holy Days specified by Leviticus 23:23–32 that occur in the early autumn.  No work permitted according to Torah.

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Rosh Hashanah 2020 will begin in the evening of Friday, September 18 and ends in the evening of Sunday, September 20. See our facebook page for updates on Congregational celebration times and dates.

72202505_1221756178024890_1415382497889353728_nYom Kippur [Day of Atonement]Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. It is traditionally observed with an approximate 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer. Children 11 & below and the sick are exempt. Elderly, people with health issues, or pregnant can do a Daniel fast- veg. & water.

It’s customary to wear white, no leather and no gold.

Yom Kippur 2020 will begin in the evening of Sunday, September 27 and ends in the evening of Monday, September 28. See our facebook page for updates on Congregational celebration times and dates.

Sukkot [Feast of Tabernacles]– Beginning five days after Yom Kippur, Sukkot is named after the booths or huts (sukkot in Hebrew) in which Jews are supposed to dwell in during this week-long celebration. Sukkot, commonly translated as Feast of Tabernacles, known also as the Festival of Ingathering or in some translations the Festival of Shelters, and is a biblical holiday celebrated on the 15th day of the seventh month, Tishrei.  Also, we are to shake the Lulav and Etrog as a form of praise for Adonai’s provision.

Sukkot 2020 will begin in the evening of Friday, October 2 and ends in the evening of Friday, October 9. See our facebook page for updates on Congregational celebration times and dates.

Shemini Atzeret/Simchat Torah [The 8th Day & Rejoice in the Torah]-Simchat Torah is a Jewish holiday that celebrates and marks the conclusion of the annual cycle of public Torah readings, and the beginning of a new cycle. We usually celebrate this commemoration by dancing with our Torah throughout the congregation. 72749414_1232450610288780_6668573146703986688_n

Simchat Torah 2020 will begin in the evening of Saturday, October 10 and ends in the evening of Sunday, October 11. See our facebook page for updates on Congregational celebration times and dates.

Check out our Facebook page or Weekly Announcements for specific info about when or how we will be celebrating each Holy Day.